Download A Son of God: The Life and Philosophy of Akhnaton, King of by Savitri Devi PDF

By Savitri Devi

ISBN-10: 0912057955

ISBN-13: 9780912057958

Rosicrucian booklet. formerly released less than the name "Son of God..."

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Additional resources for A Son of God: The Life and Philosophy of Akhnaton, King of Egypt, also titled as Son of the Sun

Example text

It is unreasonable — nay, absurd — to attribute to him a zeal of the same nature as theirs. Nor can we suppose that he suddenly changed his idea of God by the fifth or sixth year of his reign, just after completing the first temple which he built to Him. All subsequent evidence — in particular that of the king’s admirable hymns to the Sun — goes to prove that he worshipped till the end of his life that all-pervading Energy which he had discovered intuitively and which he adored already in his early adolescence.

34-35. 2 “For as my Father liveth . . more evil are they (the priests) than those things which I have heard in the fourth year; more evil are they than those things which King . . heard; more evil are they than those things which Men-kheperu-ra (Thotmose the Fourth) heard . . ) 54 Thebes) as the “City-of-the-Brightness-of-Aton” — was the signal of a bitter conflict between the king and the ministers of the Theban god. It is difficult to say what the priests actually did to assert what they considered to be their god’s rights.

But the point remains doubtful, for lack of information. And the impression the prince received must have been rather vague, anyhow. For even 1 James Baikie: The Amarna Age (Edit. 1926), p. 209. Sir Wallis Budge: Tutankhamen, Amenism, Atenism, and Egyptian Monotheism (Edit. 1923), pp. 113-115. 3 The proper explanation of the doubtless striking similitude between his conception of Divinity and that of the Aryans of India, as expressed in the Rig-Veda, lies, not in the assumption of any influence exerted upon Akhnaton, but in the fact that he was himself partly Aryan (being the grandson of a Mitannian princess).

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